CategoryHacks

S(GH)PA: The Single-Page App Hack for GitHub Pages

SPA woes

For some time now I have wanted the ability to route paths for a gh-pages site to its index.html for handling as a single-page app. This ability is table stakes for single-page apps because you need all requests to be routed to one HTML file, unless you want to copy the same file across all your routes every time you make a change to your project. Currently GitHub Pages doesn’t offer a route handling solution; the Pages system is intended to be a flat, simple mechanism for serving basic project content.

If you weren’t aware, GitHub does provide one morsel of customization for your project site: the ability to add a 404.html file and have it served as your custom error page. I took a first stab at doing an SPA hack by simply copying my index.html file and renaming the copy to 404.html. Turns out many folks have experienced the same issue with GitHub Pages and liked the general idea: https://twitter.com/csuwildcat/status/730558238458937344. The issue that some folks on Twitter correctly raised was that the 404.html page is still served with a status code of 404, which is no bueno for crawlers. The gauntlet had been thrown down, but I decided to answer, and answer with vigor!

One more time, with feeling

After sleeping on it, I thought to myself: “Self, we’re deep in fuck-it territory, so why don’t I make this hack even dirtier?!” To that end, I developed an even better hack that provides the same functionality and simplicity, while also preserving your site’s crawler juice – and you don’t even need to waste time copying your index.html file to a 404.html file anymore! The following solution should work in all modern desktop and mobile browsers (Edge, Chrome, Firefox, Safari), and Internet Explorer 10+.

Template & Demo: If you want to skip the explanation and get the goods, here’s a template repo (https://github.com/csuwildcat/sghpa), and a test URL to see it in action: https://csuwildcat.github.io/sghpa/foo/bar

Continue reading

A Renewed Call for App-to-App Interaction APIs

Cow, come in cow

The battle ground of app-to-app interaction history is littered with abandoned ideas, half-solutions, and unimplemented APIs. The current, consumer/provider interaction paradigm for apps and services is a mess of one-off, provider-defined systems that each use their own transaction mechanisms and custom data structures. This makes it hard to do simple things across N providers, like save something to a user’s preferred storage service without jumping through provider-specific code and UX hoops.

I’d like to restart the conversation about bringing legit, app-to-app interaction APIs to the Web. There have been past spec attempts, namely Web Activities and Web Intents, but I’ll argue that while they get a lot right, they all fail to deliver an A+ solution.

Continue reading

Element Queries, From the Feet Up

Everybody’s looking for Element Queries

What are Element Queries? At a high level, I’d describe them as pure, unfiltered, rocket fuel for hyper-responsive layouts and components. More technically, they are Media Queries scoped to individual elements. Element Queries would allow you to attach Media Query break-points based on the dimensions and characteristics of an element itself, instead of the page’s viewport.

Developers have wanted Element Queries for a long time. Here’s a list of articles that convey the need, along with a few attempts to make them real:

Continue reading

© 2018 Back Alley Coder

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑